Perpetual Traveler ‘PT’ by definition

PT – The Perpetual Traveler

PT is a concept, a way of life, a way of perceiving the universe and your place in it.

In practical terms, perpetual travelers (PTs) are people who live in such a way that they are not considered a legal resident of any of the countries in which they spend time.

By lacking a legal permanent residence status, they seek to avoid the legal obligations which may accompany residency, such as income and asset taxes, social security contributions, jury duty and military service.

For example, while PTs may hold citizenship in one or more countries that impose taxes based solely on residency, their legal residence will most likely be in a tax haven. PTs may spend the majority of their time in other countries, never staying long enough to be considered a resident.

In a nutshell, a PT merely arranges his or her paperwork in such a way that all governments consider him or her a tourist. A person who is just “Passing Through”. The advantage is that being thought of by government officials as a person who is merely “Parked Temporarily”, a PT is not subjected to taxes, military service, lawsuits, or persecution for partaking in innocent but forbidden pursuits or pleasures. Unlike most citizens or subjects, the PT will not be persecuted for his beliefs or lack of them. PT stands for many things: a PT can be a “Prior Taxpayer”, “Permanent Tourist”, “Practically Transparent”, “Privacy Trained”, “Party Thrower”, “Priority Thinker”, “Positive Thinker”, “Prepared Totally”, “Paranoid Together” or “Permanent Traveler” if he or she wants to be. The individual who is a PT can stay in one place most of the time. Or all of the time. One can be a full-time PT or a part-time PT. Some may not want to break out all at once, or become a PT at all. They just want to be aware of the possibilities, and be prepared to modify their lifestyle in the event of a crisis. A “Possibility Thinker” who is “Prepared Thoroughly” for the future.

‘A Free Bridge’ by Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis

“I live in Alexandria Va. Near the Supreme Court chambers is a toll bridge across the Potomac.

When I rush, I pay the dollar toll and get home early. However, I usually drive outside the downtown section of the city and across the Potomac on a free bridge.

This bridge was placed outside the downtown Washington D.C. area to serve a useful social service – getting drivers to drive the extra mile and help alleviate congestion during the rush hour.

If I went over the toll bridge and through the barrier without paying the toll, I would be committing tax evasion.
If, however, I drive the extra mile and drive outside the city of Washington to the free bridge, I am using a legitimate, logical and suitable method of tax avoidance and I am performing a useful social service by doing so.

For my tax evasion I should be punished. For my tax avoidance I should be commended.

The tragedy of life today is that so few people know that the free bridge exists.”

Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis